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Insulin Therapy Pump Therapy

Two Must-Have Books for people on Insulin or Pump Therapy

When moving to pump therapy, the idea of basal and bolus and how you use them in tandem does not make a lot of sense at first. There’s little to using long acting insulin such as Lantus than just injecting and letting it do its thing as far as your basal insulin is concerned.

But since your pump uses a short-acting insulin, you have to supply your basal insulin very small doses to mimic a long acting insulin 24 hour dose.

Getting your basal pump settings tuned is the foundation for successful pumping. In most cases you will need more than one basal rate to deal with uneven insulin requirement in the course of the day.”

The following two books have been indispensable books for me as I have tried to set basals, carb ratios, active insulin time etc. When I was first diagnosed, I struggled a lot with severe hypoglycemia.

“Think like a Pancreas” is probably the best book out there for optimizing your pump settings.

But reading Gary Scheiner’s book, “Think like a Pancreas” was just an eye opening experience. (See it on Amazon). This is the first book I would encourage anyone considering pump therapy or having trouble with BG control with their pump to get.

It might be the only book you will need to get up and running. Gary offers a myriad of real life scenarios and chances you’ll find a scenario that fits your case.

But if you want to delve deeper into the intricacies of the Insulin pump therapy, “Pumping Insulin” by John Walsh and Ruth Roberts will do the trick.